Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Barack Obama Makes Me Weepy

Obama. At around 10pm last night, briefly considered doing the responsible thing and going to bed, but tossed that notion right out the window because there aren't many moments in a life when you get to sit on the couch and experience history as it is being made. That sounds grandiose, and I generally shrink from anything resembling idolatry, but there it is. When Barack Obama came onstage, I felt myself gasp. All evening long, it seemed too much to hope for, that at any moment something could wrong. There was Henry Champ (CBC) at the White House reporting about a sudden and unexpected mob of young people running down Pennsylvania Avenue, chanting for Obama and against Bush, and it felt, briefly, like something terrible was about to happen--a riot, a display unsuitable for the moment that could potentially ruin it. But, no. It was only students coming out of their dorms from nearby universities, using their (as Mr. Champ put it) "text message machines," to call each other to a spontaneous and, thankfully, peaceful celebration. John McCain's speech was gracious, better than his entire campaign, and perhaps redemptive. And, then, finally, there was Obama walking onstage with his beautiful family in a park in Chicago, and the impossible was suddenly real.

I fear for this man. I fear for his safety. I fear for him because he is symbolic, because he embodies the hopes and aspirations of a country, and of a world. I don't know whether Americans can fully appreciate how stunning his victory is for the world. I don't know whether Americans know how far their nation has fallen in the eyes of the world under the governance of George W., but the overwhelming popular turn-out, the line-ups hours long endured by voters, the grassroots support of Obama's campaign, culminating in his victory, changes the way the world sees America. It renews faith in democracy. It legitimizes the American dream. A bi-racial man who never knew his dad, who has a foreign-sounding name, whose background is unusual, exotic, not privileged, who has not spent decades building backroom political allies, rises in his 47 years to the most powerful position in the country. I am genuinely proud to be American, in a way I never imagined feeling. There: I know it sounds grandiose. I can't help myself.

Okay, I know he faces a crazy, impossible task, trying to set the broken economy straight, working within straitened budgets, two dismal wars underway, and all the rest of it. But he has a quality that's rare: the ability to involve ordinary people in the processes of power. When people feel their voices aren't heard, or that they, as individuals, don't matter, they check out of the system. It seems like Barack Obama has the ability to bring people in, to inspire them to work together, to think of something other than themselves, other than immediate gain. Does that make him sound like a socialist? Well, where's the balance? Individual responsibility, and collective gain. Does that fit with life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness? Patriotism is a sense of belonging, isn't it?

Clearly, speechifying is not for me.

Onward.

Another freakishly hot day, so I hung two loads of laundry. Seems wrong for November. I'm baking a batch of Amish Friendship Sweet Bread, with my own improvised alterations to the original recipe. Yogurt, chocolate chips, less oil. It rose up beautifully. Tonight our family is heading to Toronto for my brother Christian's art opening at the Steam Whistle gallery. We're very excited and proud. This morning, AB said, "He's a real artist! And you know him even better than we do!" Oh dear, baby CJ is muttering to himself in the baby monitor, suggesting he's ready to get up and get busy.

3 comments:

  1. I get it. I was in tears too. (Were you moved too by the footage of Jesse Jackson with tears streaming down his face?) I am kicking myself for not getting my absentee ballot in on time; what an election to have been able to be part of.

    I also get part about your fear for Obama's safety. I hope we can laugh someday about having felt overprotective about him.

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  2. Oh, let's hope, Julia.

    Yah, I saw Jesse Jackson weeping and the TV station I was watching didn't identify him for awhile, just showed this man weeping, and even not recognizing him immediately (that guy looks a lot like Jesse Jackson, I thought to myself), it was moving to see. It was moving to see so many people moved.

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  3. What a night it was -- stayed up as well, to watch things unfold, unable to tear myself away. It was by far the best moment in a long time, and the next morning really was a new day.


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    {p.s.}
    And oh my goodness -- how exciting for Christian!

    xo

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