Monday, January 24, 2011

Word of the Year

Heart.

Because my heart, speaking literally, powers my body as I work toward the goal of completing a triathlon and/or half-marathon this year.
Because I live in my head. Because I want to allow myself to respond spontaneously, without checking in with my head. If the heart says do this, I want to. At least, most of the time. Okay, even some of the time. (I'm a little bit afraid of giving myself over to my heart; I sense that mistakes will be made; I sense also that mistakes must be made).
Because of love, compassion, empathy. Because in my efficiency, I am sometimes deficient in these most important gifts.
Because it's a challenging word, filled with challenging ideas, for me.
Because I want to explore other aspects of myself, even if it means just pushing ever so slightly against the seeming-solidity of who I am, right now.

But I'm keeping spirit, last year's word. I nominate it to be word of the decade, an umbrella under which I will develop different aspects of the spirit. What does spirit mean, to me? It means the life unseen, not of this world, and yet expressed within this world, through words and deeds. It means: there's more to life than what can be seen. It means mystery. It means being moved. Being open. Being emptied out to make room for God, for the divine.

My poetry book club met for the third time on Saturday evening. We were unable to get copies of the book we'd planned on reading, a collection by Giller-winner Johanna Skibsrud (Gaspereau Press, we suspect, is even now hand-sewing the binding in readiment for shipment by ox-cart); so instead, we all brought favourite poems to share. We were giddy. It was ridiculously fun. We are getting to know each other that much better. And best of all, there's poetry. I was deeply moved by a number of the poems, unexpectedly moved, caught off guard: ah, there's my heart, opening.

Being moved by a poem. It feels of enormous significance to me, right now, as I struggle to balance my ambitions and my sense of self, to figure out what matters, and why.

To create something that moves someone else, it's a strange talent. It might not even be a talent, but a gift, given and taken away on a whim. It's also a strange thing to want to do: to express the mysterious, to give it shape and form, and to share the beauty, joy, grief, loneliness, ache with others. It's not a profitable enterprise. It's not of this world.

Hello, January.

My new year's anomie seems to be somewhat late-flowering; 2010 was a fine, fine year, and it seemed, at its end, that perhaps nothing needed changing, not a whit. Four weeks in, and it suddenly seems everything needs changing.

I'm conscious of my underlying desire to be independent, financially; not because my survival depends on it, but because, as Fran Lebowitz says in an interview in Bust magazine: "Here is the key to independence: earn your own money ... This is true of life--people who are paying you, whether they are paying for you like parents who pay for children or paying like a boss pays an employee, they're in charge of you. You don't want someone to be in charge of you? Don't take their money."

Now, I am in a marriage I consider happy, in a partnership I consider equal; nevertheless, the fact that I earn next to nothing, that I rely on Kevin to support our family financially, bothers me, and it has for a long time. I read that Fran L. interview on Saturday and it went click in my brain: the key to independence. (I read it out to Kevin, too, and he understood). I wish I could say that writing were my key to independence; but it's not. If my family relied on my earnings, I would have to do something else, use my current skill-set in a different way; and I can't think of any job I'd want to do that would use my current skill-set. And so, I continue to return to the question: do I want to retrain? Do I want to gain a new skill-set? Do I want to equip myself for an entirely different job?

It's not that I imagine myself never writing, were I to earn my money differently. It's that I imagine myself writing the way most writers write: look around--most writers, even successful writers, have day-jobs. The most successful writers, those earning a reasonable living from their writing, work their tails off pitching stories, writing grant requests, and working freelance from job to job until they become Mordecai Richler and editors come to them with story-requests (and I happen to know that Mordecai Richler was an extremely hard-working and not at all precious writer).

I'm not much good at pitching stories. I work pretty slowly. My overall interest, when I write, is to make something lovely, not to earn money.

And that is why I come back to the idea of retraining and earning my living in another way. Earning my living, period. I've given myself the imaginary deadline of CJ entering school, which is in a year and a half, when he starts kindergarten. I will be thirty-seven, not too old, I think, to start something new.

I'm not sure that heart relates remotely to this dilemma. Or, maybe it does and I haven't puzzled out how, yet.

1 comment:

  1. Beautiful choice for your "word of the year" Carrie--enjoy all the endless possibilities it will open up for you!

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