Friday, June 24, 2011

Time for a Shiny New Post

Because, though I could look at those triathlon photos forever (and probably will), the moment has passed, and life goes on, even if it appears frozen here in Blogland.

So ... in other news: we got a new couch! (Pictured above). We lucked on it half-price back in April, ordered it, and kind of forgot about it, the way one does, until the company called to say it was coming. Now. Queue frantic clearing of living-room. And then queue um, where was this supposed to go, honey, do you remember? Because we'd originally intended it to replace the ten-year-old sofa (aka gymnasium), now sway-backed and spring-popping. But the new couch looked too lovely and clean, and besides, the living-room lacked seating; wasn't that the whole point of the new couch? So we spent our Friday evening huffing items back and forth (books! shelves! toys!), removing a few, dragging the piano to a new and starring location, hiding the communal computer (somewhat), and keeping both couches. Almost got it finished before Kevin left for his Friday night soccer game.

Right away, the kids started arguing over WHO GOT TO PLAY THE PIANO. I kid you not. I had the kitchen timer going.

The new lay-out has more reading areas. More seating in front of bright windows. More seating, period. And the piano is getting played far more frequently.

Though this is not meant to be a commentary on Boys versus Girls, or Sons versus Daughters, or Mars versus Venus, here's what the boys were doing in the newly laid-out living-room the other evening.

And here's what daughter # 1 was doing.

And daughter # 2.

This is not to suggest that daughters don't wrestle. But whenever daughter # 1 enters into the fray, holding a pillow, with a gleam in her eye, I shut the show down. I don't think this is sexist, really, I don't. It's because she aims with intent. Somehow, the boys wrestle without doing each other any harm. But AppleApple comes out swinging. She wants to Win. (Maybe I am parenting her differently. What do you think?).

5 comments:

  1. My daughter #1 is very similar to yours in this way! And in the reading way too! I most definitely shut her down and most definitely parent her differently than daughter #2. Because they are so very different. I don't think that's bad - I hope it's a good parenting strategy!

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  2. A new couch! Kids fighting over the piano! More reading space! It really does sound perfect.

    Is Apple Apple the eldest? The drive to win is very much a first child side-effect. I don't really believe in a lot of the birth order stuff, but that's one trait that I do see a lot. Or, simply, personality?

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  3. Marita, Apple-Apple is the eldest daughter, but her brother Albus is actually older by 18 mos. She's got the inborn drive to compete, and reminds me of myself in a lot of ways; whereas he's always been very laid-back, unconcerned about winning, and pretty happy just getting by.

    I think birth order could be involved (like maybe in your family, Rebecca?), though it doesn't really hold true for Albus, as the eldest--AppleApple kind of takes on that classic eldest role.

    But there's something about personality that's just unshakeable ... I am amazed at the differences between my children, how unique they are, and really, how unlike me and Kevin they are, too. So, yes, that calls for different parenting for each kid.

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  4. Beautiful couch! There is something very exciting about getting a new couch and finding the right spot.

    And is your one daughter reading Asterix? Such a fabulous comic. I ate those stories up when I was a kid. I still have all the books tucked away somewhere – perhaps I might bring them out and read them all over again, on my own big comfy couch.

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  5. Patricia, yes, that's Asterix!! A childhood favourite of mine (and my siblings), too. Oh, the gloriously bad puns. She's "reading" it, however, as she's still in the early stages of literacy. I'm amazed at how long both of the two youngest can happily sit with a bag of library books and "read." Reading via pictures--and they glean so much narrative from illustrations alone.

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