Thursday, September 13, 2012

Take your chances when they come

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I've put away the canning kettle for the season. And while this wasn't a banner canning year for me, I was reminded, as every year, that it's not that hard to do. It's time-consuming, finicky, hot, and has to be done when the fruit is ripe, that's all. Listen to the radio. Accept help. Try not to whimper because you've got one more canner full of jars to boil and it's nearly midnight on a weeknight.

For some reason, it's worth it to me. Maybe it's the colourful jars in the cupboards. Maybe it's looking forward to a winter of sauces and chilis and soups in the crockpot.

Speaking of seasonal, I had a little thought in church on Sunday (I take the family occasionally, to touch base with the Mennonite in us -- Kevin excepted, though he still has to go). The thought was this: Sometimes I'm open to soaking in experiences, observing, learning, participating, doing. And sometimes I just want to reflect. And these two states of being don't really overlap, much, for me. Or maybe they do, in ways I just can't see. Maybe what I'm trying to talk about is that sometimes I feel like I'm skimming along on the surface of things, and other times I'm very still and quiet, and I can sense the sacredness in everything. When I'm skimming along, I don't even really like the word sacred. It sounds too serious, too self-conscious, too heavy, too inward-looking. I appreciate and respect it, but I don't like it.

I don't get to decide what kind of mood or state I'm in. I'm just there. It's like being in the mood to play the piano, or write a poem. I have to accept where I'm at.

It's hard to accept where I'm at when it's somewhere I don't want to be.

I'm skimming along right now. I'm frustrated by my inability to be still and quiet.

But here's another tiny thought: sometimes -- really, most of the time -- it doesn't matter what I'm in the mood for. I have to take my chances when they come. I have to can the tomatoes while they're ripe. I have to run during soccer practice, and read stories at bedtime, and cook supper when everyone's hungry for supper. And right now I have to get revved up for readings and for meeting new people and a bit of travelling -- and even a bit of travelling is a lot, for me.

One of the places I'm travelling to is Winnipeg. I'll be there a week from this coming Monday (!!), reading at the Thin Air Writers Festival. I found this lovely blog post on their site, written by Rosemary Nixon who appeared at the festival last fall. I'll admit to some gnawing apprehension about leaving the kids and dogs and Kevin, with all the scheduling excitement to manage on their own, but Rosemary's post reminded me of the potential that is waiting in this new experience -- exciting.

A lot of life is about getting it done. And that's fine, that's probably even good, and necessary, and right. I'm privileged enough without getting to do what I'm in the mood for all the time. So the tricky part is appreciating what's going on, floating on random flotsam and jetsom amidst the current that is carrying me along, and, maybe, glimpsing something mysterious in the trees that is there to be seen.

Maybe even while skimming along, I'm catching and keeping the things that will sustain me when I'm ready to be still and quiet again.

6 comments:

  1. Winnipeg is my hometown and one of my fave places to visit! If you'd like any suggestions for awesome places to eat, I can shoot you an email.

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    1. Thanks, Kate! I'll be down by the Forks ...? I'd also love to go for a run. Wonder if there are trails nearby?

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  2. I love seeing my 37 jars of tomato sauce lining the pantry shelves. It's a piece of the summer that will carry me through the worst of the winter.

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    1. Exactly! Worth doing every time. (It's always so hard to imagine winter when summer's here, I find.)

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  3. Looking forward to hearing, possibly meeting, you at Thin Air! I enjoyed the Juliet book very much; such wonderfully evocative writing.

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    1. Dora, I hope you'll introduce yourself if you come to the reading/interview! I look forward to meeting you too.

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