Showing posts with label Juliet. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Juliet. Show all posts

Friday, November 16, 2012

One good thing about not having a dishwasher

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this morning, convalescing kid with companions

Recently I sat down and wrote out a schedule. My goal was to identify any spare pockets of time into which I could slot one of the following activities: exercise, writing, social time, Kevin time, and cleaning. (My standards are low, but even basic maintenance for a family of six without a dishwasher requires a little effort every day.) I discovered a few extra spots for running or yoga, plus worked out my strategy for maximizing my writing hours (hint: it involves scheduling separate time for email). Social time seems to be the hardest to come by.

But I did find an extra fifteen minutes here and there to throw at vacuuming and cleaning out cupboards and filing the stacks of paper that fly into the house and somehow multiply and spread to every available surface. To which I say, Whoo-hoo, without much enthusiasm.

But now I've got a kid home sick, and the schedule's gone out the window. This is temporary, right? Right??

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Last night, I visited another book club, my fifth this fall. I'll admit that I was exhausted and drained after spending the previous night at the hospital, but I had a feeling that I needed not to cancel last-minute. I needed to go. And didn't I! I was hosted by a group of mothers and daughters whose comforting warmth and welcome restored my energies. You just never know when these unexpected gifts are going to arrive. I returned home feeling repaired and strengthened by the evening.

I also got to show the book club the reprinted version of The Juliet Stories, which arrived yesterday. Oh my goodness! It looks quite different: GG finalist sticker embedded in the cover design, and new quotes from reviews on the back and front.

Kevin has made me a little gift: he put together a video with photos from this past month's GG adventure, set over top of the clip on The Juliet Stories that was played on Monday evening on CBC radio's As It Happens. Small story about that clip: I got to listen to it twice. First, I heard it live. I was washing the dishes, and I always listen to the CBC while washing the dishes (perhaps this is reason enough to remain dishwasher-free). Kevin was at a soccer game with AppleApple and the other kids were playing soccer in the rainy dark backyard, and suddenly there was my name and then my voice. I didn't call the kids in. I listened alone, appreciating the quiet. What a sweet life moment. An hour later, the whole family got to hear it together: we streamed it from the Winnipeg station online. AppleApple was beaming from ear to ear: her Halloween costume is mentioned in the intro. (Several of her siblings were slightly jealous.) When my reading came on, CJ said, "Who is that?!" "Who do you think?" And he was suddenly too shy to say, but he knew.

Click here to see the video. Thanks, Kevin. It's quite the keepsake.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Reading at IFOA for the GGs

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hospitality suite at IFOA

You're going to suspect that I do nothing but jet around to festivals and parties. Heck, let's pretend it's true. Let's pretend I'm not sitting at home in a slubby hoodie neglecting the sick kid on the sofa who is playing video games. At the very least, I'll provide no photos of my current state.

I'll admit it. I ache. I think it's a combination of playing soccer on Sunday followed by all the driving and standing and sitting required by parties and readings. I have it down now: I've got comfy but good-looking shoes for the standing parts and the parties, and I save the heels for the readings themselves.

I'm doing a bad job of telling this story.

Yesterday, Kevin and I drove off to Toronto, mid-afternoon, leaving my mom to look after the sick kid and everyone else (dogs too! good grief!). I checked in at IFOA (Toronto's International Festival of Authors), and the organizers let me use a hotel room to change in (for some reason, I didn't get a hotel room out of this event, perhaps because Toronto considers Waterloo to be a suburb or a cousin once removed? In any case, no hotel room for GG finalist Carrie Snyder). Kevin and I also ate sandwiches and eggplant dip in the hospitality suite: supper.

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here's what I decided to wear

Then we went to the IFOA party. I can't remember the title, but it was crowded with industry folk, and it was hot. I was happy to talk to the people I knew, but equally happy to stand on the sidelines and just observe. Best moment of the evening: when we were approached by a very excited woman who came right up to Kevin and said, "Junot Diaz?!" Needless to say, my husband is not acclaimed American writer Junot Diaz (who wasn't at the party in any case), but when we checked the author photos in the IFOA guide, we thought, hey, maybe he should put on a name tag. And grow a goatee. Because otherwise, people, I'm basically married to Junot Diaz.

The woman was embarrassed when she realized that I was the writer, and that she'd never heard of me. People keep joking that I may need to change the title of this blog, but I'm not too concerned. I reassured her, and she said she'd buy my book. (But I'm thinking she'll probably buy Junot's instead.)

Should I do more name-dropping? It seems almost obligatory. Here's who we talked to at the party: Sarah MacLachlan (my publisher); various Anansi people; a lovely woman from the Canada Council who had read my book thoroughly enough to know exactly which story I was going to read when I told her the title (I was impressed!); Iain Reid (One Bird's Choice); Linda Spalding (fellow GG finalist) and her husband Michael Ondaatje; Ania Szado (a writer with whom I toured back in the Hair Hat days); Eva Stachniak (The Winter Palace; she is Ania's friend); Mark Medley, books editor of the National Post, who commissioned my best writing assignment ever, which just ran on Saturday: a review of Alice Munro's new book, although it is more ode than review; the woman who thought Kevin was Junot; and a few others, though possibly by accident. We were there for an hour and a half, so clearly we didn't excel at the mingling.

Then Kevin spotted Vincent Lam (The Headmaster's Wager; fellow GG finalist). Vincent was leaving the party, so we thought we'd better follow him, because I didn't really know where I was going for the actual event. Vincent and his wife were both super-friendly, and possibly super-human (he's an emergency dr and she's a family doc and they have three kids under 7). We had a nice chat. After awhile, we were joined by an IFOA publicist, and Linda Spalding, and set off for the theatre, quite clearly going the wrong way. There we all were, tramping around in the dark surrounded by a very high fence. "I'm sure IFOA will provide us with a ladder," said Linda Spalding. Thankfully, no ladders proved necessary. Eventually, we went the right way, and were soon backstage at the theatre. Our group now included Robert Hough (Dr. Brinkley's Tower) and Tamas Dobozy (Siege 13) and the poet Phil Hall (Killdeer).

I tweeted a terrible photo. Vincent Lam tweeted a better one. Guess which is which.

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We met Shelagh Rogers. She gave me a scarf because it was freezing backstage, and you've seen what I was wearing. I read second to last, which gave me ample time to freak out. I handled my nerves by going into an almost comotose stillness during the first several readers. Conserving my energy, I thought, if I thought anything at all. It was kind of peculiar, actually, and prevented me from doing any useful networking backstage. But when it was nearly my turn, the stillness broke and I got very jittery, which was quite unpleasant. I don't usually get so jittery. I had to go for a little walk in my noisy high heels. But then I thought, just harness the energy and be glad you've got it: better lots of energy than none. I also thought, perhaps rather melodramatically, You're doing this for Juliet, so just go out and do it.

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that's me onstage

So I went out and did it. I settled down instantly, under the lights. I read "She Will Leave A Mark" from the first section. I think the story carries more poignance and depth after you've read the second section, but it's a good story even on its own. I love reading. The only emotion I felt at the very end of the story was, well, a kind of bittersweet sadness. Because the moment was over.

I enjoyed being asked by the stage manager if I'd like something to drink at the booksigning table (white wine, please!). And I enjoyed signing books. Kevin brought our stack and had all the GG finalists sign them, but there was a mix-up with Vincent Lam's. Kevin is going to need to find a second wife named "Sandra" in order for the dedication to make any sense. More proof that my blog title is in no danger of becoming obsolete. But then Michael Ondaatje shook my hand and told me he'd loved my reading. Hm. So maybe fifty-fifty.

The evening was starting to get really fun, probably because my publisher Sarah and her husband Noah Richler were on the scene, so we were talked into going back to the hospitality suite, which we hadn't planned on doing, being responsible parents from Waterloo, Ontario. Just being around Sarah and Noah has the effect of regressing me to my pre-child self -- almost; but let's not call it regression. Let's call it staying in touch with my spontaneous glam girl side. I'm shocked to report that side still exists.

But I'm not shocked to report that spontaneous and glamourous doesn't go exceptionally well with early mornings and sick kids and walking wet dogs in the rain.

No regrets. This is an strange and happy little bubble of a moment. I'm going to float while it's floating. (But thanks to kids and dogs I'm quite sure that I won't float away.)

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

What I've been up to ...

photographing the photographer
What a weird and wonderful week it's been. I am positively bubbling with creative energy. And, right about now, caffeine. Which might explain the rapid-fire typing you're hearing.

Yesterday had a stinker of a start. Well, not the very early start, which was spin class, and which, though I never quite got into it, still kicked off the day with a rush of happy endorphins. But then I got home. And discovered that CJ was refusing to go to nursery school, again. And you know, he's been sick, so I wasn't sure. Maybe he was still a bit off? Okay, kid. I'll give you another day. Even though that means cancelling my morning plan to go record a song at my brother's studio. Fine. Except it wasn't fine, and I wasn't fine, and I had to go to the basement and throw laundry into the washer and yell things and slam the door and perform other unpleasant and completely immature venting activities. It put a pall on the general everyone-heading-off-to-school-and-work part of the morning. I have a rotten temper.

It's all about the expectations. I'd expected and planned to do one thing, and when plans suddenly shifted, I was disappointed. And frustrated. And facing another housebound day with a less than willing spirit.

But I came around, in a moping sort of way, to acceptance, and went on with the changed plans. When suddenly the phone rang--it was Kevin. His morning appointment had to be rescheduled. "I'll come home and look after CJ, and you can go and record." "Seriously?" "Seriously." Well, off I went, let me tell you.

Proof that a stinker of a start doesn't mean the whole is ruined. Remember this. Remember, and leap for the unexpected opportunities that parachute into your hours.

Why didn't I take my camera? My brother's new studio is filled with light. It's an old Mennonite schoolhouse, one big room, and I sat right down at the piano to get loosened up. And then we recorded. Just one simple song, a lullaby. I wrote it for a character in Juliet. In fact, I'm pretty sure I wrote it as my character. Because my brother Karl is such an amazing and talented producer, as well as a musician, I know we're going to have a beautiful song at the end of the process. It's exciting. And I found myself up late last night perfecting more songs as my character. It's weird, but I can write songs as her better than as me. Maybe it gives me the distance necessary to be vulnerable, to allow myself to tap uncritically into emotions and even a particular style that I can ascribe to her. Maybe it's like writing a poem in a persona. I won't question it. It's working.

This morning, I surfed the creative wave toward a different shore. It helped that CJ trotted merrily off to nursery school--unquestionably healthy again. PRAISE BE. This morning, my friend Nancy arrived with coffee to share, and her camera. She is working on a new project that she calls "ipowr," or "Intriguing People of Waterloo Region," and she chose me as her first subject to interview and to photograph. I couldn't resist photographing her too, plus it put me at ease to stand behind the lens. A nice way to warm up, perhaps for both of us. Less pressure. The photo above makes me think of a villa, a place both stark and soft, and somehow old-fashioned. The crop doesn't quite do it justice. You can see the original here.

And so that is my yesterday and my today. I am basking in creative activities that would seem outside of my comfort zone. But neither feel like a stretch. Instead, both are extensions of what I'm already doing. And I'm brimming with appreciation for this quiet time between major projects, when I can do and try anything.

The world is full of beauty and light.
I am teetering on the brink of over-caffeination.
It's all good.

Friday, January 14, 2011

Sunrise, Sunrise

What amazes me is how something doesn't exist, and then it does; and when it does, it seems always to have existed.

I want to write something about this writing week, but all I can think of to say is that I'm done. I'm done with the writing week. But I'm also done with the bulk of the writing. I stayed up late working last night, pausing only to dash out to a yoga class in between daytime writing and nighttime writing. And today, a really amazing story came.

So, I'm done.

Tinkering, up next.